How to Make Hard Boiled Eggs {Kitchen Tip By Colleen Delawder

A featured kitchen tip by Colleen Delawder from Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck on how to make hard boiled eggs. Her technique gives you perfect eggs every time! | TheMountainKitchen.com

Do you like hard boiled eggs? I don’t, but David does. He puts them in his potato salad, his tuna salad and even his chicken salad. He even makes deviled eggs for himself from time to time. He even has a deviled egg dish for them.

I cannot count the number of times I have heard him in the kitchen mumbling a few choice words at hard-boiled eggs. For some reason, there is always a problem with his hard-boiled eggs.  Most of the time when he peels the eggs the shell picks away part of the white. The eggs do not come out cleanly from the shell. Sometimes they aren’t even hard boiled and are under cooked and more like soft boiled.

Most recipes for hard-boiled eggs say place the eggs in a saucepan, cover them with water, bring to a boil, turn off heat and then let them sit for 10 minutes or so. Even Martha Stewart’s site says to do them this way. This doesn’t work for everybody, especially not David… Does this happen to you too?

Today’s featured kitchen tip was submitted by Colleen Delawder from Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck Survive Despite a Whiskered Accomplice. Her kitchen tip is how to hard-boil eggs. Here’s what Colleen says you should do:

A featured kitchen tip by Colleen Delawder from Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck on how to make hard boiled eggs. Her technique gives you perfect eggs every time! | TheMountainKitchen.com

Hard Boiled Eggs | Time: 1 hour 17 minutes 

Ingredients:

  • eggs
  • 1 large pot
  • cold water
  • pasta fork
  • 1 large bowl
  • Ice

Directions:

  1. Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the eggs by at least one-inch.
  2. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat.
  3. Turn the heat down to medium, and use a pasta fork to slowly place one egg at a time into the hot water.
  4. Cook the eggs for 17 minutes.
  5. Fill a large bowl ΒΎ of the way full with ice, and then add cold water. Use the pasta fork to remove the cooked eggs from the hot water and place them into the ice bath.
  6. Allow the eggs to bathe in the ice bath for at least an hour, before removing them for use, or storage in an airtight container to be refrigerated.

When I told David about Colleen’s technique he said:

“I knew it took longer than 10 damn minutes!”

You can believe David will give her technique a try then next time he wants hard-boiled eggs!

How do I know her technique works without even trying? Well that is easy, Colleen is a 2014 Eggland’s Best Finalist! Go over to http://www.egglandsbest.com/yourbestrecipe and vote for her Balsamic Deviled Eggs with Pancetta recipe in the Eggland’s Best “Your Best Recipe” Contest.

Also check out all of her egg recipes:

Balsamic Deviled Eggs with Pancetta  /  Italian Caper Deviled Eggs  /  Pumpkin Deviled Eggs  /  Deviled Egg Potato Salad

Thank you Colleen for your kitchen tip submission  and the providing your beautiful images. GOOD LUCK with the contest!! πŸ™‚

For further improvements and suggestions about hard-boiled eggs: Click HERE to visit Colleen’s blog posting about how to hard-boil eggs.

Hard Boiled Eggs
A featured kitchen tip by Colleen Delawder from Faith, Hope, Love, & Luck on how to make hard boiled eggs. Her technique gives you perfect eggs every time.
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Total Time
1 hr 17 min
Total Time
1 hr 17 min
Ingredients
  1. eggs
  2. 1 large pot
  3. cold water
  4. pasta fork
  5. 1 large bowl
  6. Ice
Instructions
  1. Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the eggs by at least one-inch.
  2. Bring the water to a rolling boil over high heat.
  3. Turn the heat down to medium, and use a pasta fork to slowly place one egg at a time into the hot water.
  4. Cook the eggs for 17 minutes.
  5. Fill a large bowl 3/4 of the way full with ice, and then add cold water. Use the pasta fork to remove the cooked eggs from the hot water and place them into the ice bath.
  6. Allow the eggs to bathe in the ice bath for at least an hour, before removing them for use, or storage in an airtight container to be refrigerated.
Adapted from Faith Hope Love & Luck Survive Despite A Whiskered Accomplice
The Mountain Kitchen http://www.themountainkitchen.com/

14 thoughts on “How to Make Hard Boiled Eggs {Kitchen Tip By Colleen Delawder

  1. Thanks so much for sharing my tip and the contest link! Fingers, toes, and paws crossed that I get enough votes to win! I hope David has better luck with this recipe than the last. The shell being stuck to the egg is most likely because the eggs are too new. You really want eggs that have been in your house for two or more weeks for hard-boiled eggs. I ran across this problem over the weekend when I had to make 3 dozen eggs, and forgot to plan ahead. I usually will go to some random small place to try and find older eggs, but every little place I went to had funky egg storage that I didn’t trust, and very off brand eggs…I didn’t want to take the chance of killing someone with bad eggs so I just bought some at the market and attempted to peel very carefully. What a pain!!! Tell David I totally get how he feels…I’ve tried all of the “wrong” recipes as well. I just don’t get what magic stoves, pans, and boiling water these people have that I don’t!

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  3. I will give you a report the next time he tries to make hard-boiled eggs. Thanks so much for your input and spreading the word about how to really make them! πŸ™‚

  4. Wow!
    This is interesting..
    I’ve always done the boil for 8-10 mins, let cool a bit (aka 1 min), then peel and enjoy.
    I probably wouldn’t like them if they took any longer πŸ™‚

  5. "Cheffie Cooks"

    Hi Debbie and David, I too cook my hard-boiled eggs longer than 10 minutes. Key is to allow them to cool well in cold water before attempting to peel. I usually have good luck with them! Your Fl. and Tk. Bud. Cheryl

  6. Sherri Parker Thompson

    You can also add a little baking soda to the water and it will make for easier peeling. Also, check this out on Pinterest….you can make a hole on each end of the egg and actually blow the egg out of the shell. I like that David uses egg in all those recipes…I didn’t know anybody didn’t. LOL All my life, those things have had eggs in them. Thanks for another way to easily shell the eggs.

  7. Haha, Sherri! I like the white but the yolks stink!! I used to eat only the whites and considered the yolks the chicken and that’s the reason it stunk! My mama doesn’t eat eggs of any kind except as an ingredient to a dish. Thanks for your comment!

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