Texas Style Brisket

Texas Style Brisket

This recipe for Texas Style Brisket is one that was recommended to David by Sara Moulton.

David’s big smart-mouth got him selected to cook with Sara Moulton last month when we attended a cooking class at Nibblins in Winchester, Virginia. If you haven’t seen the video or had the chance to read the post, click HERE.

Before the show, we got a chance to meet Sara and talk with her a little, while she autographed her new cookbook: “Sara Moulton’s Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better”.

I’m not sure exactly how the subject of brisket came up, but Sara mentioned a recipe for Texas Style Brisket in the cookbook that she wanted us to try, and she implored us to follow the directions exactly how they are written. Her friend Elizabeth Karmel gave her permission to use it in the cookbook. She said this Texas Style Brisket was some of the best briskets she had ever had.

As you know, David and I love brisket. Our Mountain Kitchen Beef Brisket has been very popular lately with over 7000 pins. We were very eager to try out this Texas Style Brisket recipe.

This Texas-inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart.

Here’s the easy-to-follow recipe:

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Build a charcoal fire and set up a grill for indirect heat. Preheat the grill to 250 degrees F. To maintain this low temperature, use only half as much charcoal as usual. (A half chimney-full.)

In a medium bowl, combine the rub ingredients; mix well.

Rinse the brisket under cold running water and blot dry with paper towels. Combine all the ingredients for the rub in a small bowl and stir to mix. Rub onto the brisket on all sides and let it stand for 5 minutes.

Place a drip pan with 12-ounces of beer directly under the brisket directly under the meat to stabilize the temperature.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

When the coals are ready to cook, place the brisket on the hot grate over the drip pan, fat side up, toss a hand full of the soaked wood chunks and some dry wood chunks onto the coals.

Cover and cook slowly for 4 to 5 hours at 225 degrees F. You will need to add fresh coals and more wood chunks to each side of the grill every hour for at least the first 4 hours.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Check the temperature of the grill every hour, staying as close to 225 degrees F as possible. Resist the temptation to open the lid unless you need to add more charcoal or soaked wood chips to maintain temperature and smoke.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

When done, an instant-read thermometer, such as The Thermapen® Mk4, inserted in the middle of the brisket registering 190 F to 200 F. The meat should be very tender.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Take the brisket off the grill and wrap it in foil for at least 1 hour. Holding helps tenderize by allowing some carryover cooking which helps melt tough connective tissue. The foil captures the natural au jus for use in a sauce, and holding allows the surface parts that have dried out during cooking to absorb some of the juices.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Wait to slice the brisket after about 20 minutes and when you are ready to serve. Brisket dries out quickly once it is cut. When you are ready, Turn the meat fat side up so the juices will run onto the meat as you slice across the grain.

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Serve with Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce if desired.

To make the Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce, add all the ingredients into a small jar with a lid, shake well and serve by spooning it over the brisket or pouring into a small dipping bowl.

Notes about the sauce:

It will keep indefinitely, covered in or out of the refrigerator.

The hot sauce gets hotter the longer it sits, make the sauce at the last-minute and discard the unused sauce, unless you love spice!


 

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com

This brisket was a lot different from the brisket we usually smoke. A welcomed change in our brisket world. The sauce was a little too spicy for our liking, but who needs sauce when it comes to really good smoked beef brisket?!?

My Signature

This Texas inspired, this Texas Style Brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart. | TheMountainKitchen.com
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Texas Style Brisket

This Brisket is a Texas Style brisket is coated in a flavorful, spicy rub and smoked for hours until so tender in nearly falls apart.
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword brisket, smoked beef brisket, spicy, texas style
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Total Time 5 hours 10 minutes
Servings 10
Calories 651kcal
Author David & Debbie Spivey

Ingredients

  • 9 pound beef brisket untrimmed
  • ½ cup Lockhart dry rub (recipe follow)
  • 1 bottle beer
  • oak or mesquite wood chips soaked in water for 30 minutes

Lockhart Dry Rub

  • ½ cup Kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons coarse fresh cracked black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons cayenne pepper

Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce

  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper or more to taste
  • 1 tablespoon red chili flakes or more to taste

Instructions

  • Build a charcoal fire and set up a grill for indirect heat. Preheat the grill to 250 degrees F. To maintain this low temperature, use only half as much charcoal as usual. (A half chimney-full.)
  • In a medium bowl, combine the rub ingredients; mix well.
  • Rinse the brisket under cold running water and blot dry with paper towels. Combine all the ingredients for the rub in a small bowl and stir to mix. Rub onto the brisket on all sides and let it stand for 5 minutes.
  • Place a drip pan with 12-ounces of beer directly under the brisket directly under the meat to stabilize the temperature.
  • When the coals are ready to cook, place the brisket on the hot grate over the drip pan, fat side up, toss a hand full of the soaked wood chunks and some dry wood chunks onto the coals and cover the grill.
  • Cover and cook slowly for 4 to 5 hours at 225 degrees F. You will need to add fresh coals and more wood chunks to each side of the grill every hour for at least the first 4 hours.
  • Check the temperature of the grill every hour, staying as close to 225 degrees F as possible. Resist the temptation to open the lid unless you need to add more charcoal or soaked wood chips to maintain temperature and smoke.
  • When done, an instant-read thermometer inserted in the middle of the brisket registering 190 F to 200 F. The meat should be very tender.
  • Take the brisket off the grill and wrap it in foil for at least 1 hour. Holding helps tenderize by allowing some carryover cooking which helps melt tough connective tissue. The foil captures the natural au jus for use in a sauce, and holding allows the surface parts that have dried out during cooking to absorb some of the juices.
  • Wait to slice the brisket after about 20 minutes and when you are ready to serve. Brisket dries out quickly once it is cut. When you are ready, Turn the meat fat side up so the juices will run onto the meat as you slice across the grain.
  • Serve with Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce if desired.

Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce

  • Add all the ingredients into a small jar with a lid, shake well and serve by spooning it over the brisket or pouring into a small dipping bowl.

Notes

Lockhart Dry Rub: depending on the size of your brisket, you may not use all of the rub. Store the leftover rub in an airtight container.
Spicy Vinegar-Chile Hot Sauce: It will keep indefinitely, covered in or out of the refrigerator.
The hot sauce gets hotter the longer it sits, make it at the last-minute and discard unused, unless you love spice!
Recipe adapted from a recipe by Elizabeth Karmel in Sara’s book: Sara Moulton’s Home Cooking 101: How to Make Everything Taste Better
 

Nutrition

Calories: 651kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 85g | Fat: 30g | Saturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 253mg | Sodium: 5996mg | Potassium: 1423mg | Fiber: 1g | Vitamin A: 16.6% | Vitamin C: 1.3% | Calcium: 3.8% | Iron: 46.3%
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12 thoughts on “Texas Style Brisket”

  • Brisket seems so intimidating! Y’all killllllled it, though. Looks delicious. My husband will love this one!

  • That’s the stuff! Nothing beats a big old brisket. We just recently ate the last of our 4th of July brisket. What a great chunk of meat to have in the fridge. We’ve done everything from brisket omelettes, to chopped brisket sandwiches of course. Even made a crude brisket casserole that hit the spot. A versatile meat! Anyways, looks great! Good job.

    And hey to David!

    PotP

  • Well being from Texas most of us know how to make brisket.
    I have won the Texas state championship twice in a row bbq champion.
    I can tell y’all that recipe resembled nothing of brisket cooked here in central Texas.
    First off temp was a little high usually want to run between 180-225 degrees.
    Second a Texas brisket usually only will have salt and pepper on it.
    No garlic nothing else until it’s time to wrap it in butcher paper at a temp around 150 degrees.
    You’ll wrap it in butcher paper and at that point can add your favorite sauce to it for more moisture.
    When internal hits about 205-210 degrees pull it off smoker.
    Rest is best way of course to help it make itself awesome. We use only oak well some folks in south Texas use mesquite but I wouldn’t let a piece of mesquite in my smoker that would be worst thing ever to happen to it. It makes a butter tasting brisket unless your super hot fire abd you drop a few small chunks into hot hot fire usually coal.

  • Tried it, by tje recioe and WAS NOT imoressed. It came out bland and not as smoky and the bark with ring was not there. Im from Connecticut but when I moved to Dallas, I had brisket as my first meal. This wasnt it. I recommend you get with Rickey and rework this into something a Native Texan would eat. Thanks

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