Wonton Soup {Revisited from February 2014

Wonton Soup {Revisited from February 2014

If you’ve ever poked around The Mountain Kitchen, you may have seen my hideous post about wonton soup from back in February 2014. It didn’t look very appetizing and I can’t blame anyone for ignoring that post. I made this soup recently and decided that my beloved homemade wonton soup was too good to look that ugly. So, I took the opportunity to write this new and improved blog post…

I’ve made wonton soup many times since I posted about it three years ago. It’s one of our favorite winter soups. If you are wondering what the heck a wonton is, they are a type of Chinese dumpling, usually filled with a small amount of filling made of minced pork and spices wrapped in a very thin and delicate wrapper, most often served boiled in a rich delicious broth. They are like the Chinese version of ravioli, but with entirely different flavors.

The first time I made this soup, it was cold and snowy outside. It was and still is one of those soups that goes down soothes your soul and melts away the chill in your bones. The perfect winter meal!

Pssst! I’ll let you in on a little secret…  David and I don’t get along very well in the kitchen. Shhhhh!

We don’t. We’re loud and obnoxious to each other.  We each have very strong opinions on how things should work and we spend most of the time arguing and telling the other the way we think things should be.

It’s ok… No, really it is. We have accepted that flaw in our relationship and we have moved on.

However, when it comes to making wonton soup David usually helps me make the wontons. It saves me some time in the kitchen. Don’t get me wrong, wontons are really easy to make, but it is a little time-consuming when making so many at once. This soup is quick and easy if you make only one batch. We make the wontons ahead of time and once they are all made, I freeze them to use for a simple weeknight meal. It’s like doing two meal preps at one time when making a double batch.

For this soup, the wontons are stuffed with a mixture of pork seasoned with soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, then gently simmered in ginger, chicken broth with mushrooms and chopped scallions. Here’s how you make wonton soup for freezing and eating:

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Make the Wontons:

Combine the pork, scallions, rice vinegar, cornstarch, sesame oil, soy sauce and ginger in a medium bowl. Mix by hand, like you would a meatloaf. Combine well but try not to overwork the meat.

Next, fill a small bowl with water. Place a Wonton wrapper on a clean plate or work surface (cover remaining wrappers with a damp towel or cloth, to keep them from drying out while working). 

It’s funny, up until I decided to redo this blog post, I could not figure out how to fold wontons the way I wanted to, so I would always stop after folding them into triangles. This time something clicked in my head and I figured out how to fold them like I have always wanted to. Go figure!

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Put a heaping teaspoon of the pork mixture onto the center of the Wonton. Dip your finger into the water and run it along the edges of a wonton wrapper.

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

Fold the wrapper diagonally over the filling, pressing out any air, to make a triangle. Press the edges firmly together to seal.

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

With the point of the triangle facing you, use your index finger to push the folded side of the triangle down, bringing the two points together over the top. Dip your finger into the water once more, to moisten the two points. Bring the two points together and pinch over the filling to seal. Repeat with the remaining wrappers.

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

As you finish making the wontons, lay them on a large plate or platter (wontons not touching), until all of the pork mixture is gone or until you run out of wonton wrappers. Using only a heaping teaspoon inside of each wonton works really well. You hardly have anything left over. If for some reason you do run out of wrappers, make small meatballs out of the leftover meat. If there are wonton wrappers, you can freeze them for another time.  


Freezing The Wontons:

If you are making the Wonton Soup right away, reserve half of the wontons; set aside.

To freeze the wontons, place the plate or platter of wontons (wontons not touching) inside the freezer for about 30 minutes. This will allow them to set and not stick together when putting them into the bag inside the freezer.  (Set a timer so you won’t forget to package them up.)

After 30 minutes, they should be firm to touch. Transfer them to a freezer safe bag, and place in the freezer, for later use.


Make the Wonton Soup:

In a large saucepan, bring the chicken broth, water, bouillon cubes, soy sauce and sliced ginger to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low; let the ginger steep for about 10 minutes. Remove the ginger from the broth using a slotted spoon or strain through a sieve.

Return the broth to a gentle simmer; using a slotted spoon, gently add the prepared wontons one at a time, into the simmering broth. Increase heat as needed to keep a gentle simmer. Cook, stirring gently every few minutes, until the pork is done and the wontons begin to float, 5 to 8 minutes.

Add the mushroom slices to the soup during the last minute of cooking, to soften.

To serve, divide the wontons and mushroom slices among serving bowls using a slotted spoon, then ladle some of the broth into each bowl. Sprinkle with scallions, and/or shredded cabbage and add a few drops of sriracha, if desired.

Serve hot!

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com

*Note: This recipe makes a double batch of the wontons. One batch is for freezing and the other batch is for making the soup. The wonton soup portion of the recipe is only one batch of the soup. You will need to make another batch of the soup broth when you are ready to make wonton soup from the frozen wontons.


The first time I made wontons, I made vegetable ones for Meatless Monday. That recipe is what lead me to this pork version. Unless you grind your own pork or you are fortunate to have a grocery store that grinds meat fresh, it is hard to find a package of ground pork that is less than 1 pound, that is why I make a large batch and freeze half of them for later use.

I highly recommend that you freeze a batch. The frozen wontons make for a great weeknight meal. Just take out the bag of the prepared wontons out of the freezer and drop into the steaming broth. You can have a delicious sole warming soup in no time!

Take that winter!

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth. | TheMountainKitchen.com
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Wonton Soup

This wonton soup is made of dumplings filled with a mixture of seasoned ground pork, soy sauce, rice vinegar, and ginger, gently simmered in ginger broth.
Course dinner, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Asian, Chinese
Keyword Wonton Soup, wontons
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 297kcal
Author Debbie Spivey

Ingredients

The Double-Batch of Wontons

  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 2 large scallions trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • ½ teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger finely grated, or more
  • 40 wonton wrappers or 12-ounce package wonton wrappers

The Single Batch of Wonton Soup

  • 1 quart chicken broth
  • 1 quart water
  • 2 chicken bouillon cubes
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce divided
  • ½ teaspoon fresh ginger thinly sliced
  • 20 prepared wontons
  • 4 ounces mushroom caps thinly sliced
  • Garnish with sliced scallions optional, sriracha, shredded cabbage

Instructions

Make the Wontons

  • Combine the pork, scallions, rice vinegar, cornstarch, sesame oil, soy sauce and ginger in a medium bowl. Mix by hand, like you would a meatloaf. Combine well but try not to overwork the meat.
  • Next, fill a small bowl with water. Place a Wonton wrapper on a clean plate or work surface (cover remaining wrappers with a damp towel or cloth, to keep them from drying out while working).
  • Put a heaping teaspoon of the pork mixture onto the center of the Wonton. Dip your finger into the water and run it along the edges of a wonton wrapper.
  • Fold the wrapper diagonally over the filling, pressing out any air, to make a triangle. Press the edges firmly together to seal.
  • With the point of the triangle facing you, use your index finger to push the folded side of the triangle down, bringing the two points together over the top. Dip your finger into the water once more, to moisten the two points. Bring the two points together and pinch over the filling to seal. Repeat with the remaining wrappers.
  • As you finish making the wontons, lay them onto a large plate or platter (wontons not touching), until all of the pork mixture is gone or until you run out of wonton wrappers. Using only a heaping teaspoon inside of each wonton works really well. You hardly have anything left over. If for some reason you do run out of wrappers, make small meatballs out of the leftover meat. If there are wonton wrappers, you can freeze them for another time.

Freezing The Wontons

  • If you are making the Wonton Soup right away, reserve half of the wontons; set aside.
  • To freeze the wontons, place the plate or platter of wontons (wontons not touching) inside the freezer for about 30 minutes. This will allow them to set and not stick together when putting them into the bag inside the freezer. (Set a timer so you won’t forget to package them up.)
  • After 30 minutes, they should be firm to touch. Transfer them into a freezer safe bag, and place in the freezer, for later use.

Make the Wonton Soup

  • In a large saucepan, bring the chicken broth, water, bouillon cubes, soy sauce and sliced ginger to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low; let the ginger steep for about 10 minutes. Remove the ginger from the broth using a slotted spoon or strain through a sieve.
  • Return the broth to a gentle simmer; using a slotted spoon, gently add the prepared wontons one at a time, into the simmering broth. Increase heat as needed to keep a gentle simmer. Cook, stirring gently every few minutes, until the pork is done and the wontons begin to float, 5 to 8 minutes.
  • Add the mushroom slices to the soup during the last minute of cooking, to soften.
  • To serve, divide the wontons and mushroom slices among serving bowls using a slotted spoon, then ladle some of the broth into each bowl. Sprinkle with scallions, and/or shredded cabbage and add a few drops of sriracha, if desired.
  • Serve hot!

Notes

Recipe Yields: 40 Wontons + Only 4 Servings of Soup
This recipe makes a double batch of the wontons. One batch is for freezing and the other batch is for making the soup. The wonton soup portion of the recipe is for only one batch of the soup. You will need to make another batch of the soup broth when you are ready to make wonton soup from the frozen wontons.

Nutrition

Calories: 297kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 44mg | Sodium: 2233mg | Potassium: 488mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 0.6% | Vitamin C: 21.2% | Calcium: 5.1% | Iron: 14.5%
Did you try this recipe? Please give this recipe a star rating, leave a comment below and share pictures of your food with us on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter! We can’t wait to see them!Mention @TheMountainKitchen or tag #TheMountainKitchen!

Featured photo updated 1/15/2018



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